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Bringers of Disease (band)
After finishing my review of the Bringers of Disease album, Gospel of Pestilence, I threw some questions together for the band to answer. Dave Mann was gracious enough to get back to me with the answers. Check out what he had to say about the recording and more!


How’s everything going? I hope all is well for you and the band.

Dave:
Well, things could be worse. Life, as usual, is often grim and disappointing. As far as the band is concerned, things are great. Just released our first EP, we have a solid and consistent lineup, and we’re writing new music. As far as band stuff goes, couldnt be much better!

How has life been since the Gospel of Pestilence EP release? More hectic then usual, or about the same?

Dave:
Same, i guess. It seems like everyone’s lives are falling apart everywhere you look. We’re no exception, but i doubt the record has anything to do with that. At least now we have something to show for our efforts!

Has the EP met your and/or the band’s expectations as far as how the Black Metal community received it, or even just in sales?

Dave:
We were all very happy with how the record turned out. From studio to press it was probably the most problem free record I’ve ever been a part of. Although we dont really want to be tied down with the black metal label, we were all curious how it would be received by that community. Really, we’re playing METAL. That’s what matters to us, and we made a record that we are all proud of.

The band originates from Dayton, Ohio. Is there a large Black Metal community over there?

Dave:
No. A decent amount of fans, but few bands. Dayton is a small city, with few clubs to support its rock/metal scene.

Has the community helped you and the other members of Bringers of Disease create the music found on Gospel of Pestilence, or is Dayoton, Ohio really that grim and cold?

Dave:
It just really does suck here that badly. Most of the bands from here have a unique quality that i think reflects the grim nature of a dead post-industrial city.

Who or what were some of the large inspirations for the album outside of any other local bands and where you live?

Dave:
This might sound like a copout, but all metal. Obviously we had a general direction or a theme in mind when we started writing, but very few things are taboo at the writing table. We never say, “lets put a____ part there” or “we need to write a song like a_____ song”. My personal biggest influence is when i bought the “Haunting the Chapel” EP in 1986. changed my life.

I read the band formed in 2009, and since then you signed with Translation Loss Records for this EP. Why did you guys chose this label? Were any other labels interested at the time?

Dave:
We never really shopped it around. We were sitting on the material through a few member changes, and once we got a solid lineup we figured it would be best to release it and move on.

Why was it only a four song EP? Surely after two years Bringers of Disease have enough for a solid foll-length…

Dave:
Yeah. After forming the band, things got a little chaotic. We replaced our first bass player, lost one guitarist, then his replacement moved to chicago. A lot of us are in other bands, so during these down times not much got done. Thats why once we started writing it seemed like a good idea to get that material out there, instead of just throwing it away.

Have you begun working on a follow-up full-length album already, or are there any plans or negotiations going on now in regards to it?

Dave:
We have two new songs that we are playing out at shows, and some material that is still in the works. We should be ready to record sometime very soon. Our deal with “gospel” was a one-off, so we will be looking for label very soon. We’re all very stoked about the new material, and look forward to seeing what the future holds for us.

What are the bands intentions at this point after the release of Gospel of Pestilence? Will you be heading out on tour or anything else to push the EP?

Dave:
We’re looking to do some shorter regional tours, and possibly something longer like a southern or east coast tour this year. Mostly i think we’re going to focus on finishing our full length.

Were there are problems that came up when writing the EP or while in the studio to record it?

Dave:
Both the writing and recording of this record were super problem free. We tracked it in our rehearsal space, and the engineer (John Lakes) is a good friend of ours. He was really easy to work with, and he and I mixed the record at his house in just a couple of sessions.

The production quality on the album was actually rather clear, having a little muddiness to it, but still sounding like a modern, digitally recorded effort. Why is that, and did the band considering recording this as a low-production release that has become a staple for more underground Black Metal acts?

Dave:
Well, we did have a very low budget to work with. We borrowed mics from our local rock club, tracked it on a laptop, and mixed in John’s bedroom. Although the budget was small, and our opinions about black metal differ within the band, we all agreed we didn’t want the ultra low production that has come to define the genre. however, we also didnt want an ultra-clean death metal style production. I think what we ended up with was a good compromise of the two. Raw and aggressive, but without being too clean or too dirty.

Bringers of Disease
Bringers of Disease
Interview conducted thanks to Translation Loss Records via Earsplit PR.