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I had a chance to shoot over some questions via e-mail to Chopstick Suicide thanks to Clawhammer PR. The following are the responses from Yagiz.

Chopstick Suicide

Prior to your upcoming album, you issued two EPs and a previous full-length. Do you feel that “Lost Fathers and Sons” shows a great deal of growth in the group compared to those previous outings?

Yagiz:
Of course, with every recording our lives, feelings, life stories, lyrics, music and it’s structure has changed. Also our exprience and technicality with our instruments got developed over the years.

After sampling some of the previous release, Loserville, it sounds like Lost Fathers and Sons is a little more restrained and less Avant-Garde from the more technical and Mathcore aspect. Was this a goal for this album, or do you not see it that way?

Yagiz:
I like Loserville very much. Not the production but the songs. Our first album was more like a “technical show-off”. With Lost Fathers and Sons we kinda balanced the “technical shit, odd timing, different playing styles blabla” and “having fun with people when you play live”.

Lost Fathers and Sons does still have a good deal of variety to it either way. Were there any major influences to the sound you guys recorded this time around, whether physical or musical?

Yagiz:
Well all have different taste in music from punk to funk, death metal to Rihanna… But mostly and definitely metal. I can’t give you specific names but they definitely influenced us while we were recording.

How about your local scene, or just Turkey in general? Is there a lot of Mathcore bands that you guys possibly do live shows with, or pull inspiration from when it comes to the material you write/record?

Yagiz:
Unfortunately we are the only mathcore band in Turkey. But we are having lots of extreme music gigs with whole different band from post rock to grindcore… Few bands are inspiring us in here and they are very good at what they do.

Has there been a strong interest outside of Turkey for Chopstick Suicide? If not, do you hope that “Lost Fathers and Sons” may appeal to a broader worldwide demographic this time around?

Yagiz:
-No.We had some feedback from before but not many. With Lost Fathers and Sons we are hoping to get some attention. We are working on it. If not, fuck it. We are gonna play music anyway. We don’t have any expectations or dreams in music business.Life killed it.

Getting to the material on Lost Fathers and Sons, the song “Your Average Hero” is a lot longer compared to other tracks, clocking in at over eight minutes, and it clearly goes in a different direction compared to others on here. What was the band’s goal with this track when you were writing it?

Yagiz:
Most of our songs are fast, short. I wrote some of the riffs oof it then I asked “why not?”. I showed it to the guys,they liked it. Anything can happen in our band.We can even write a pop song on the next album if its sounds good.

Do you think that Chopstick Suicide may try to write more longer, atmospheric songs like “Your Average Hero” in the future, or was this just a random recording that you guys really wanted to write and may not do again?

Yagiz:
It was kinda random and new. But why not?

There’s also the song “Kolpa” which feels more like an energetic Punk outburst. Is there a specific purpose behind it, perhaps more a song to perform live and get the crowd riled up? Or was this just an outlet for pent up frustrations during the recording phase?

Yagiz:
I can say both. That song’s like, “Ok we did all that stuff blabla but let’s go back to the basics and beat each other.” Like morning shitting. It’s relieving.

You titled the album Lost Fathers and Sons, but yet this is not the title of one of the songs. Why did you choose this name, and does it have something to do with a concept for the entire recording?

Yagiz:
I always feel like albums should have a main name for it’s content. Like a concept but it’s not. Lost Fathers and Sons is mainly about man collapse. Album’s name coming from me and Mert [Vocals], it defines how we feel about our fathers,most people’s fathers.

How about the artwork? It seems quite different from the kind of thing you might expect to see on a Mathcore recording. Is there some kind of symbolism to be found in it with the tree growing out of the person’s back, or is this just something you guys thought looked cool?

Yagiz:
We always like minimal attitude on our artworks.It makes contrast with our music. There is a symbolism but it’s subjective.

You have made a number of songs off the album available on-line, and I’m sure you have played some of these live as well. What has the fan response to to this been like? Have listeners been happy with “Lost Fathers and Sons” so far?

Yagiz:
They are kinda “friends who come to our show” rather than “fan”s but yeah so far, feedbacks are positive. As we come our live performances, they are pretty intense and brutal. Even though you don’t like the music, you definitely enjoy our live presence.

Speaking of live, are there any current plans for the band go out on tour through Turkey, or anywhere else to promote the album? Or are funds limited to a more localized set of dates only?

Yagiz:
We definitely want to play in many countries if we have any money.We are working on it. Other than that,we are contionusly play gigs in Turkey.

Thank you very much for your time. I really hope that all goes well for you with the album, as well as anything else you guys have planned in the future for Chopstick Suicide.

Yagiz:
Thank you for having this interview with us.