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Dragged Into Sunlight (band)
Dragged Into Sunlight‘s latest album Widowmaker is upon us, and as a fan I couldn’t be more excited. Of course, I was even more pumped when I was cleared to shoot over some interview questions to the band. The following answers come from their vocalist, T.


It’s been three years since Hatred for Mankind was released. What has the band been doing since then, aside releasing a severely limited live album in 2011?

T:
We toured the UK and Europe a few times.  We also performed at Roadburn Festival, SWR Festival and Maryland Deathfest, as well as touring the USA with our friends in Cough and MAKE.

Speaking of the live album, what prompted you guys to record one so early on into your career, as well as make it limited to just fifty copies?

T:
Drugs. Terminal Aggressor was recorded on a broken cassette deck, we cut the artwork and copied each tape ourselves.  It set precedent for Dragged Into Sunlight’s position as having a DIY ethic.

In my review I interpret Widowmaker as suffering a heart attack due to the album’s name and atmosphere later on. Is this a concept you were going for with the album, or perhaps something else if any actually exists?

T:
Widowmaker as a title refers to a heart attack and refers to the music.  The concept underlying the music is an entirely different prospect.  The concept is a theme rather than a story, there is a very specific feeling underpinning the record, centered on loneliness and isolation.  Perhaps indicative of the manner in which the record is best appreciated.

Why did the band decide to make this a three song album, using over eleven minute long “parts?”

T:
Widowmaker is intended for one sitting however we can appreciate that some may struggle to digest the record whole.

“Part I” finds a near fifteen minute mixture of what I’d describe as Doom and Stoner Metal that sounds really different compared to your debut. Why did you tackle this track in such a manner, while leaving the rest to sound like the Dragged Into Sunlight fans might be expecting?

T:
It is what it is.  Dragged Into Sunlight draws on vast spectrum of extreme music and Part I more so than other recordings brings to the forefront some of the more unique driving forces in the band’s sound such as Earth, Growing, Ginnungagap and Om. Widowmaker separates those who like music because it is popular from those who share a genuine passion for high quality music.  Individuals able to genuinely appreciate music will recognize Widowmaker as a high quality construct and despite its differences, it offers the same reward to those open minded individuals who really take the time to listen to a record and that is best reflected in the reviews of the record to date. 
 
The question to be posed is why would a band look towards re-writing an existing piece of music? Plenty of bands do to develop an existing sound, although all too often however, the follow up offers nothing new to the listener and is a masked solution for ‘safe’ music.  Widowmaker encompasses new ground for Dragged Into Sunlight and new ground for those listeners willing to join us on this venture. 

Will we be seeing more songs like “Part I” composed by Dragged Into Sunlight on future albums, or perhaps even just one song albums instead of having them cut into a few different parts?

T:
Dragged Into Sunlight is not a fixed entity and our recordings move concurrently.  You are hearing exploration at ground level as far as Dragged Into Sunlight is concerned. 
 
We anticipate revisiting the sounds explored on both Terminal Aggressor and Hatred For Mankind moving forward.  It really depends where we are at musically with any one movement and the future is never certain.

Why did the band decide to tackle this with such a crisp production quality instead of a rawer one? Do you feel that the instruments coming off any rougher might have hurt what the band was going for with this recording?

T:
There are a variety of instruments on Widowmaker such as moog, violin, Indian bowls and piano.  Such a variety requires a crisp production to highlight key aspects of the music.  The production is very suited to the recording and that is what matters.  It is not about following a set pattern.  If we were to repeat Terminal Aggressor, we could have done just that, ultimately we opt to secure a production that is complimentary to the record and an appreciation of the bigger picture.  Dragged Into Sunlight is a very selfish endeavour and our priority is therefore making a record that is the best it can be, regardless of time and other such trivial factors.

Considering it’s only three songs, and the length per each, was WidowMaker actually easier to record in the studio, and perhaps less time consuming? Or was it the other way around?

T:
Widowmaker was more time consuming, very much because the sound was so abstract.  The record was written and recorded for one sitting and whereas in hindsight, one might argue that three shorter parts is an easier adjustment however considering that the record is written as a whole, it proved to be a far more challenging prospect.

When you guys do hit the road again, what can fans who attend expect? Has there been any thought to performing the entire WidowMaker album on stage from start to finish?

T:
Everything heavier and louder than everything else.  A trail of self destruction and total chaos.

Can fans also expect to see another limited to fifty self-released live album from any of those future tour dates?

T:
Perhaps.  We are in the process of completing several new recordings.

Is there anything else you would like to mention before I let you go?

T:
Misery forever.

Dragged Into Sunlight: WidowMaker
Dragged Into Sunlight
Interview conducted thanks to Prosthetic Records.