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Septekh
I recently performed a text interview with Staffan Persson, drummer of the Death/Thrash Metal group Septekh. Check out his response.

Thank you for taking some time to talk about the band and The Seth Avalanche. First of all, how’s everything going for you and the band? I hope all is well.

Staffan:
Thank You. All is well indeed. More than well right now actually! We just came back from the legendary Silence Studios in Sweden where we have been recording for the last ten days.

What has been going on in the world of Septekh since The Seth Avalanche was released through Abyss Records? Have things been a little more manic than usual?

Staffan:
Things have definitely been more hectic and intense but mostly because of the recording session I mentioned above. We haven’t really been able to go out and promote The Seth Avalanche that much since its release because by then we were rehearsing heavily for the recording of our full length. The EP was supposed to come out earlier but that did not happen so we just forged ahead with our plans. Septekh has never been a band that rests on its laurels when it comes to creating music.

Staffan:
But there has of course also been some interviews and reviews which is nice. So there’s been far more activity this summer than the last one when half the band was injured as well!

How did it come about that Abyss Records picked up Septekh, and why did the band decide to sign with them?

Staffan:
Dan contacted us on Myspace (remember those days? Haha) and declared himself a fan. Abyss seemed like a nice label that was on the rise so we decided to give it a shot. Also it seems to exist for the right reasons. Dan is very passionate when it comes to metal!

The bio included with the album doesn’t mention this at all, but it seems The Seth Avalanche has the same songs and track list from your Not Quite What I Had in Mind EP from 2009. Were these tracks re-recorded, or is this just a re-release with a different title? Also, why did you choose to go about it this way?

Staffan:
It is more or less the same. We re-recorded some of the bass tracks and mixed the whole EP again (more seriously this time). Also it was mastered for this release. The NQWIHIM version was not properly released at all, we just sold it at gigs and sent it to a couple publications/zines. The idea was always to get it released through a label so more people could hear it. What was not planned though was that it would take this long for it to get out, but sometimes things are beyond your control. But I’m really glad that is out now so people can listen to and get into the band.

The band also had a demo from 2009 that had six differently titled songs on it. Considering you used the material from the previous EP, was there any consideration to including the demo material as a bonus incentive that just couldn’t happen for some reason? Or was there a reason this didn’t happen like nobody thought about it at the time?

Staffan:
No. It is a demo and was never meant as a release. Maybe it could be included as bonus material on some release in the future. But I think right now, with only one recording out, we really want to keep demo material separate from “real” tracks.

Is there any chance we’ll see the demo material published at some point down the line, or can fans somehow obtain this material legally on the net or through the band?

Staffan:
Yes, you never know (see above). We might have some physical copies left still and you can download a digital version from our site.

Much of the EP sounds rather consistant to a specific sound, but “Fuckslut from Hell” and “Eating the Maneater” just sound like a whole other band performing them. Why did Septekh go about these songs in that manner? Were they just for fun, were they originally a direction the band wanted to go in, or any specific reason?

Staffan:
Nah, I just think they represent two different extremes of the style we have on this E.P. We are a very groove oriented band and maybe that shines through in these tracks the most. Maneater has got those bluesy riffs so I can see how that sets it apart and maybe Fuckslut From Hell comes off as a more punky tune due the consistent and relentless d-beat drumming courtesy of myself. But they still share a lot of DNA with the other tracks I would say.

When I heard those two songs, I could pick up on certain bands that might have influenced the band at some point. Were there any albums that you guys were either listening to or really spoke to the members to make them want to form the band in first place that could be felt on this recording?

Staffan:
Not really. Maybe the first Death Breath record since it was a show of theirs that rekindled the metal flame inside Mr. Wikström and made him want to start a band. Otherwise it’s the usual influences and inspirations that have always been there.

Speaking about the songs specifically, are there any new songs the Septekh has composed, or are waiting to record at some point? If so, mind describing what the future of Septekh’s music has in store for the fans?

Staffan:
Oh, there are a lot of them. First we are going to release another EP this year titled “Apollonian Eyes”. It was recorded in the beginning of 2010. After that we started to work on the full length that we just finished recording (see above). So two years worth of writing and rehearsing has gone into that record and it will represent a new chapter for the band when it is released.

Speaking about the new music all I can say is that it’s on a new level. It’s thicker, more beautiful and harsher at the same time. The groovy bits are more infectious. The fast and brutal bits hit harder. The hooks are stronger. All in all I think the new material carries more weight and is a bit more focused. If The Seth Avalanche was the warm-up then this is the real deal. Apollonian Eyes is the bridge between those first recordings 2009 and this place where we are today; a much darker territory where the stakes are higher.

I personally loved the way the audio sounds on this album. First of all, how did it come to be that you recorded with Erik Forsberg at Midtown Music, and had Mattias Fornell master it. Also, what was it like working with the two?

Staffan:
We found out about these gentlemen through friends that knew them/had worked with them before. Erik is really easy to work with and fast when it comes to technical studio gear stuff. He also doesn’t mind going the extra mile so with the help of some super delicious beverage (both hot and cold) and alot of iron will we were able to record everything during one weekend!

About how much input the band have as far as the production end of things went? Did you push for certain aspects either of them didn’t want, or did you just let them do their thing and waited for the final product?

Staffan:
Too much I’d say. Since we are not studio engineers or producers ourselves we maybe were a bit out of our waters when it came to mixing. We pushed for and tried to get a sound that maybe was not there in the first place. So we went overboard a couple of times. For that last mix we just made clear what we wanted and sat back to let the one who knows the workings of the studio machine to do his thing. I think it worked out fine. With mastering we just let Mattias try one track and since we liked the result we knew that he could take care of the rest.

Mind breaking down the gear that Septekh had used in the studio to record this EP?

Staffan:
The things I’m sure of are: an old Tama Rockstar kit for the drums and a not-too-common Fender amp for the guitars (for that twisted razor sharp sound). Nothing really fancy or extremely rare, just solid and ever so reliable stuff!

Well, again, thank you very much for your time. I really appreciate it. I hope that all goes well for the band, and hopefully some day we’ll see you here in North America! Take care!

Staffan:
Thank You! North American tour is on top of our wishlist. Keep your eyes out for “Apollonian Eyes” later this year and please prepare yourselves for the full length album in 2013! We are just starting out.

Septekh: The Seth Avalanch
Septekh
Interview conducted thanks to Clawhammer PR.