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Leprechaun: Origins

Leprechaun: One of the most embedded names within the Horror genre to date. A series about a pint sized wise-cracking leprechaun who will bite off your ear and make a boot out of it if you so much as touch his pot of gold. Since debuting in 1993, the franchise has found him in Las Vegas, sent him into orbit (Leprechaun 4), and even in the hood not once, but twice (Leprechaun in the Hood, Leprechaun: Back 2 tha Hood). The mixture of comedy, gore, and Irish lore was a picture perfect formula for cult film and b-movie lovers everwhere. So when the WWE announced they would be doing a prequel (which actually turns out to be a reboot) of this series under the guise of Leprechaun: Origins with wrestler Dylan “Hornswaggle” Postl as the living myth, no one knew what to expect until the trailers started rolling out to show a darker, grittier version of the villain we’ve all come to know and love. But, as a stand alone modern take on the franchise, does Leprechaun: Origins actually stand as a film worth seeing, or is it really as poor an experience as most critics have hailed it to be?

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At The Gates: At War With Reality

When you discuss Melodic Death Metal, and even the Gothenburg style, there’s plenty of names that come to mind. However, the one that tops both of those lists of pioneers is the Gothenburg, Sweden group At the Gates. The entity was initially activated in 1990, unleashing their Gardens of Grief demo in 1991. This led to their debut The Red in the Sky is Ours through Deaf Records in 1992, and With Fear I Kiss the Burning Darkness a year later through the same label. Their dark and brooding momentum had begun, but it wasn’t until 1994’s Terminal Spirit Disease through Peaceville Records that they started to take the form we know them as today, ending their career in 1995 with Slaughter of the Soul, the band’s career defining recording. It wasn’t until 2007 when At The Gates reunited for a number of shows and live recordings, then called it a day again in 2008. But, 2010 saw them reactivate once more, and thanks to the positive reaction from fans, the first new album in nineteen years was announced in January of 2014 with the Slaughter of the Soul line-up. The end result is the conceptional (and long overdue) fifth full-length At War With Reality. But is this really the next chapter in the group’s lineage, or is this nothing more than rehashed material that “was never released”?

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Walking Dead on Broadway: Aeshma

Walking Dead on Broadway came to life in late 2009, and has remained the same quintet ever since. The German based Deathcore unit that, according to the accompanying press release, has taken on the name as “a metaphor for suffering, malevolence and all the evil mankind is causing” has earned a stout and loyal following from live performances and their 2012 self-released EP Welcome to Corpse Wonderland. For Halloween of 2014, we are given their debut full-length album, Aeshma, which will see worldwide release through Impericon Records. But does this outfit genuinely stand out among the many carbon copy clones that litter the market, or are they nothing more than a collection of hype men?

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Septycal Gorge: Scourge of the Formless Breed

Turin, Italy based Technical Brutal Death Metal group Septycal Gorge have been in existence since 2004. Chances are fairly high you have come across them, their material, or perhaps even their name at some point of your life by today, even though their output has not been that abundant. The year they formed saw their first demo, followed by the Delivering Hidden Mutilation EP in 2005, and their debut full-length Growing Seeds of Decay. Come 2007 the pattern was reset, issuing another demo, a four-way split with Modus Delicti, Onirik, and Fleshgod Apocalypse titled Da Vinci Death Code, and their follow-up album Erase the Insignificant in 2009. After having worked with a number of underground labels like Mutilated Records and Permeated Records, the band went on to record and independently release their third full-length, Scourge of the Formless Breed, which was picked up by Comatose Music for distribution one month later. But have the years shown a band maturing in brutality, or is this another example of when modern production values go bad?