Misc.

Stephen King: “Big Driver”

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“Big Driver” is available on Full Dark, No StarsStephen King: Full Dark, No Stars
The second short story in the Full Dark, No Stars is “Big Driver.” Unlike the “psychological” aspect that this book tries to push, especially with the previous story in the set called “1922,” it actually treads into the rape revenge setting, something a little uncommon in the author’s works of the past. Given the concept of the story, it is safe to say that it does play into the dark nature of humanity though, which is another aspect this compilation of tales likes to boast about itself. But, with so many novels and films that take this genre and do it quite well, does “Big Driver” end up contributing to it, or is this one simply not that memorable?


Review – Andrew Bonazelli: DTV (Book)

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Andrew Bonazelli is a managing editor over at the Decibel magazine. Over the years, he’s taken his work outside that medium and put them to literary form. With a couple other books under his belt, such as The Regular and Deathless Obscene, he returns to book shelves once more with his latest offering, DTV. The book itself acts more like a modern “Where Are They Now?” telling of eighties and nineties washed up Action movie stars in a manner that blurs the lines between reality and film. But, is this a good enough concept to fill up a ninety plus page novel in the form of a entertaining homage, or will it simply become too tongue and cheek while poking the belly of the film style largely missing from today’s movie going experience?

Review – Stephen King: “1922”

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When it comes to Stephen King, many say that the man can write no wrong. However, I have found many of his “short” stories to be more enjoyable than his epic tomes he calls a novel length tale. “1922” is the first story of five in the Full Dark, No Stars compilation book, and given that this is meant to be a collection of really dark material, it was something that couldn’t be passed up. But, does this tale really satiate the hunger for a quality, if not brief, psychological thriller?

Dave Brockie: Whargoul

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David Brockie: Whargoul
Back in late December of 2010, I received an e-mail from one of my contacts about a special item being released that day by Gwar frontman Dave Brockie, better known as Oderus Urungus. It was the day that his novel, Whargoul, was being released exclusively through Amazon. Of course, I began to jump for joy as a Gwar fan, and my assumption of this book being an expansion of the character the song “Whargoul” was created around on their album Ragnarök. The first chance I have to order this book, I did, and the next day, there it was amid the various other items ordered, one item per box (way to waste trees, Amazon!), and it quickly was in my hands. I cracked it open. I plowed through the first forty or so pages, and then I quickly realized that Whargoul was not going to be what I had expected despite my correct assumptions of the story and it’s concept.