Movies

Review – The Babadook

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The Babadook. When this film debuted, it was all many a horror fan could/would talk about. Even two years later, this supernatural psychological horror still stands as one of the most well received films of the genre in the past few years. It even has the honor of being acknowledged as the character boyfriend to Pennywise from It following the LGBTQ+ community declaring the later a gay sex symbol (yes, really). I put off watching this one for a while due to generally due to being overwhelmed with many other movies to watch and health issues, but I recently decided to break out the blu-ray and give it a spin. Was it all everyone made the film out to be, or the polar opposite of all the love it somehow earned?

Review – Street Trash

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When you consult certain underground horror circles, one film many have an appreciation for is Street Trash. The now cult classic penned by Roy Frumkes and directed by James M. Muro dropped towards the end of the eighties, and one quick look at it screams an obvious product of that era. It’s been thirty years and after happening upon this film on-line I was immediately interested in the core concept of a toxic brew being sold that can kill you. But was it worth it, or is this a bigger letdown than most will let you believe?

Review – The Darkness (Blu-Ray)

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Blumhouse Films has easily become one of the most well-respected names in horror as of late. Their catalogue of theatrical releases and straight to DVD/VOD offerings are always met with grand anticipation, and for good reason. Aside some bland offerings as of late, the company has released some of the most exciting films and franchises for all walks of horror fandom. Their latest effort, The Darkness, was greeted with plenty of excitement as well. However, the theatrical run saw plenty of mild reviews much like their recent films Unfriended, The Gallows, and especially Ouija. But was the movie as bad as many make it out to be, and does the blu-ray version offer anything worth giving it a second chance with the detractors?

Review – The Meat Puppet

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The Meat Puppet initially came about back in 2012 according to the year stamped on it over at the Internet Movie Database, though didn’t get an official release until late July of 2015. The film is the product of brothers Billy Pepitone (Stuck in the Middle, Gravedigger) and Joseph Pepitone (Stuck in the Middle, The Jersey Devil), based on a story pitched by Keith Collins (Grave Digger, Non Compos Mentis ), and edited by director Joe Valenti (Echelon 8, Lying Beside You) for production through his company Valenti Vision Films. Additional support later came from Silver Phoenix Entertainment and Beach Point Productions before being picked up for distribution through TomCat Films and Girls and Corpses, both versions making the rounds and earning further praise for the indie flick. But is this creation one well worth sinking your teeth into, or is it best left buried out in the backyard?

Review – Hush (2016)

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Hush has become one of those films to come out of nowhere and quickly garner a lot of praise from movie lovers of all walks of life. The film was written by director Mike Flanagan and lead actress Kate Siegel for Intrepid Pictures. The product was eventually released through Blumhouse Productions, and found its way to Netflix, where most of the attention and praise has been generated. And, really, the concept of a deaf woman being hunted in her own home is one worthy of it, leaving lots of potential a top psychological thriller in 2016. But does Hush actually live up to those expectations, or is all its success stemming from the critical hype?

Review – Farm

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Farm is another zombie horror/drama flick in a day and age where zombie themed films are in an over-abundance. This one comes to us from writer/director Paul Farrell (his debut writing effort) and director Hank Bausch known for his work on Broken and Disposable, working under the production company name Uncharted Cinema. Initially released in October of 2011, this obscure independent entry has found its way on-line through Amazon’s digital library and others to probably come, but more recently the ten-movie compilation set from Echo Bridge Entertainment called Fear the Dead, which is where I happened to find it. Being one of the very few to peak my interest, I buckled in to see what this entry had in store. What was presented, however, was simply astonishing, and not exactly in the best of ways.